Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | .... | 258 | 259 | (Page 260) | 261 | 262 | .... | 360 | newer

    0 0

    Rayshawn Riddick, 31, of Newark was arrested Thursday. A second suspect in the shooting, Michael Martin aka "Maniac," 26, also of Newark, remains at large.

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- Authorities have arrested one of the men they believe was involved in the fatal shooting of a city man found dead in his car last month.

    Rayshawn Riddick, 31, was taken into custody Thursday after police received a tip about the Newark man, Middlesex County Prosecutor Andrew Carey said in a release. 

    The prosecutor's office charged Riddick with murder, conspiracy, and weapons charges on Aug. 29 and released his photo in an effort to find him.

    A second suspect in the shooting, Michael Martin, aka "Maniac," 26, also of Newark, remains at large, Carey said. The county is working with city police and the FBI to track down Martin, who also faces murder, conspiracy, and weapons charges. 

    The two men are accused of shooting Hakim Williams, 31, multiple times. Williams was found dead on Aug. 18, police said. 

    Anyone with information about the homicide is asked to call (732) 745-5217 or (732)745- 3254, as authorities are continuing to investigate. 

    Tips may also be sent anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers of Middlesex County at 1-800-939-9600 or submitted online at www.middlesextips.com. Tips may also be sent by text message to 274637. Crime Stoppers provides a reward for any information that leads to an arrest.

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

    0 0

    Marianne McIntire-Caulfield, 62, of the Iselin section of Woodbridge, pleaded guilty to second-degree engendering the welfare of a child.

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- A babysitter of 30 years pleaded guilty Thursday to a charge she endangered the welfare of a 6-month-old boy who died shortly after being placed in her care.

    Marianne McIntire-Caulfield, 62, of the Iselin section of Woodbridge, pleaded guilty to second-degree engendering the welfare of a child. She will enter a program for first-time offenders for a period of three years.

    As part of her plea agreement, McIntire-Caulfield cannot have any unsupervised contact with children under the age of 16. She was also barred from operating a daycare in New Jersey.

    Authorities responded to McIntire-Caulfield's home Dec. 1, 2015, after she called police about a 6-month-old boy in distress, police said. The baby, William, was taken to John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Edison, where he died a short time later.

    The caretaker was charged four weeks later.

    She admitted in court Thursday that she placed the child, who had a history of acid reflux issues, on his stomach for a nap. Her defense team, however, claimed the child died of sudden infant death syndrome.

    McIntire-Caulfield was babysitting for as many as eight infants that day. They were subjected to "unsanitary conditions," the prosecutor's office has said. 

    During the hearing, the infant's mother, Tracy Vidaurre, said McIntire-Caulfield manipulated her and her husband by lying about possessing a license to run a daycare. She also claimed to be a registered nurse trained in CPR.

    "None of this was true," she said.

    That became clear to Vidaurre's husband, Rob, when he went to pick up two of their sons that day and McIntire-Caulfield came to the door with William "lifeless in her arms," Tracy Vidaurre said.

    "She went from being the most trusted person in my family's lives to someone we wish we'd never met," Vidaurre said. "She gained our trust by manipulating and lying to us for years."

    Vidaurre said she and her husband daydream about what their child would have been like had he not died that day. They also frequently answer questions from their other sons about when they will see William again.

    "The phrase, 'This too shall pass,' does not apply to child loss," Tracy Vidaurre said.

    If McIntire-Caulfield does not complete the program, she could be re-sentenced to up to 10 years in prison, Superior Court Judge Michael Toto said.

    In answering questions from her defense attorney, Darren Gelber, McIntire-Caulfield said she performed CPR on the child after calling police. She said she now understands that professionals recommend infants be placed on their backs for sleep.

    "Do you now understand that the reason why the [American Academy of Pediatrics] made that recommendation was to try to reduce the number of death by SIDS and to reduce the risk of suffocation in infants?" her attorney asked.

    "Yes," she responded.

    Vidaurre, appearing before the judge with a photograph of William, called McIntire-Caulfield devious and neglectful, saying she acted in greed by lying to them about her qualifications. She said McIntire-Caulfield was aware of the child's acid reflux issues and was instructed to put him to sleep sitting upright, not on his back or stomach.

    "We literally felt our hearts break on Dec. 1, 2015," she said. "Time stopped and our world crumbled."

    McIntire-Caulfield's defense team said she had the child's best interest at heart and had cared for the family's other children. While Gelber called the incident an immeasurable tragedy, he said the defense team does not agree with allegations brought by the Vidaurre family.

    "This case, your honor, in many respects has no explanation," he told the judge. "Even the medical science I reviewed in connection with this case can't seem to establish the cause of William's death."

    Luke Nozicka may be reached at lnozicka@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukenozicka.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

    0 0

    Jahmeel Stevenson, 21, was indicted Thursday on charges he shot and killed his older brother in June, authorities said.

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- A Piscataway man was indicted Thursday on charges he shot and killed his older brother in June.

    Jahmeel StevensonHenry Stevenson Jr. and Jahmeel Stevenson (Provided photo)
     

    Jahmeel Stevenson, 21, faces charges of murder, possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose and unlawful possession of a weapon in the fatal shooting of his 24-year-old brother, Henry Stevenson Jr., of Piscataway, authorities said. 

    The younger Stevenson shot his brother June 16 after an argument at their residence, the prosecutor's office said. 

    Henry Stevenson was found by police lying on the ground with multiple gunshot wounds near the intersection of West 3rd Street and Poplar Place shortly after 7 p.m. that day, police said. 

    He was taken to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick where he later died, authorities said. 

    Jahmeel Stevenson was charged in the killing a week later. 

    On the night of the shooting, police taped off half-a-block in the residential neighborhood for more than four hours and appeared to focus their investigation around a detached one-car garage.

    In May 2015, the two brothers were arrested after a neighborhood dispute led to the stabbing of a 34-year-old man in the abdomen, police said. The incident occurred near the same intersection as the fatal shooting.

    The two were charged in the incident with attempted murder, possession of a weapon and possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose, authorities said.

    Sources with knowledge of that investigation have said the dispute began after the victim complained to the Stevenson family about speeding their vehicles through the neighborhood.

    Investigators also arrested their father, Henry Stevenson, 46, after he attempted to persuade potential witnesses to the assault to change their stories, authorities said. He was charged with witness tampering. 

    It is unclear what came of that case. 

    Police have said the men lived on West Third Street.

    Luke Nozicka may be reached at lnozicka@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukenozicka.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.


    0 0

    If you wonder whether we need to learn more about these rolling bombs, ask a first responder. Watch video

    Ask the Teaneck Fire Chief where an oil train accident ranks among the things that keep him up at night, and Anthony Verley responds, "Well, it has to be in the top five, no doubt."

    Roughly 20 oil trains run through seven New Jersey counties each month along the CSX River Line - within feet of our schoolyards and backyards and town centers - all carrying millions of gallons of highly-combustible Bakken crude oil in aging tanker cars on their way to a Philadelphia refinery.

    "Just one car derailment or fire would be a disaster," Verley thinks as they pass by his station. "And multiple cars. . . ."

    That would incinerate an entire town. And given that CSX had experienced two derailments in the last three years, there should be few secrets between the railroad and people like Verley, who has to know what to do if one of these a rolling bomb explodes.  

    Gov. Christie doesn't agree. He recently vetoedbill that required more transparency from CSX about its schedules, tanker contents, inspection reports, and disaster response plans - claiming that the first responders already have enough information and that such "irresponsible and reckless" disclosure invites a terror risk.

    Any first responder can kibosh the first assessment: "We have some of that info - there's an app we can access if we had to," Verley says. "But the department would appreciation more transparency from CSX, sure."

    Oil trains need greater oversight | Editorial

    And Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg, D-Bergen, wrecked second argument: "I've seen them park these oil trains for hours near a middle school in Teaneck - totally unguarded - while the engineer goes off for coffee," she says. "You don't have to be a terrorist to know what's in these tankers. What a load of BS."

    The Record reported that CSX lobbied the governor aggressively before his veto, and now it's time for New Jerseyans - especially those near the CSX line in Bergen, Hudson, Essex, Union, Middlesex, Somerset, and Mercer Counties - to lobby their lawmakers to override it. 

    Because governments that don't plan for disasters usually get burned by them.

    Public deserves information about N.J. oil trains | Editorial

    Such horrendous failures are paraded across our screens almost every day now, in the form of a myopia when it comes to disaster preparedness.

    In Florida, it's the willful ignorance of sea level rise, which is hard to tolerate in a state with 1,350 miles of coastline. Their governor has banned state agencies from using the terms "climate change" and "global warming" in official documents. With mid-range projections of 17-inch increases in sea level by 2030, that is his way of saying that it's not his problem.

    In Texas, it's a disdain of regulations, such as mandating transparency from the petrochemical companies that dominate Houston. Their governor used the chemistry lobby to get the EPA to kill a federal proposal that would require more audits and disclosure because it was "burdensome." Now 24 first responders are ill after inhaling fumes at a post-Harvey explosion at an organic pesticide plant, which was under no obligation to reveal its chemical inventory.

    Nothing against Florida and Texas, but we have no great desire to be like them.

    They clearly don't value prescience in their elected officials.

    Scott Knowles, a Drexel professor who has analyzed the evolution of disaster responses over two centuries, made this point in an NPR interview Wednesday: "The challenge is to get out of 'event thinking,' or looking at a disaster as a distinct event with a beginning, middle and end," because many disasters are, in fact, the result of bad government decisions.

    Weinberg's bill would spare us from such myopia. Her peers largely agree: The bill passed the Senate (33-5) and Assembly (54-16-4) in landslides. It's time to bring it back, if only to let people like Chief Verley rest a little easier at night.  

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


    0 0

    The programs will combat storm runoff and work to improve the quality of water in several lakes, rivers, streams

    The state Department of Environmental Protection has announced a dozen grants for programs that will enhance protection of waterways in their communities.

    The grant money comes from the DEP's Water Quality Restoration Grants (WQRG) for Nonpoint Source Pollution program.

    Specifically, the money comes come from the state's corporate business tax, Natural Resource Damage settlements secured by the DEP, and money from the federal Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water Act, the DEP says.

    Nonpoint pollution is commonly known as storm runoff and the DEP says it's the most significant issue affecting the quality of water in the state's lakes, rivers, streams and estuaries.

    Runoff contains agricultural fertilizers, that can cause algae blooms, and runoff also contains pesticides, oil, automotive fluids, litter, dirt and silt that degrades water quality and ecological habitats. All of it deprive waterways of their aesthetic value and diminish recreational enjoyment.

    Controversial $180M pipeline clears last major hurdle in Pinelands vote

    The grants:

    - $4.6 million to remediate a former scrap yard in Perth Amboy as public space that will utilize green infrastructure technologies, living shorelines and restored natural habitats, sponsored by the Perth Amboy Redevelopment Agency.

    - $800,000 to provide education, public outreach and develop strategies to improve water quality in the Wallkill River watershed, sponsored by the Sussex County Utilities Authority.

    - $735,000 to reduce nonpoint source pollution in Monmouth County's Deal, Sunset and Wesley lakes through green infrastructure, vegetated buffers, tree boxes and two floating-wetlands islands, sponsored by the Deal Lake Commission. The lakes are in or bordering Asbury Park.

    - $600,000 to retrofit stormwater basins in Franklin Township, Somerset County, associated with the Delaware & Raritan Canal, development of agricultural best management practices, and other enhancement projects, sponsored by the New Jersey Water Supply Authority.

    - $450,000 for the design and installation of filtration swales in Manalapan and retrofitting of an existing retention basin as a wetland, ongoing monitoring of Manalapan Lake, and related efforts, sponsored by the South Jersey Resource Conservation & Development Council.

    - $450,000 for the implementation of best management practices and education for agricultural landowners in South Jersey's Upper Cohansey River and Upper Salem River watersheds, sponsored by the New Jersey Audubon Society.

    - $400,000 for efforts to restore water quality in Beden Brook in Hopewell Borough through a variety of strategies, including assessments of impervious cover and green infrastructure, sponsored by the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed.

    - $400,000 for the creation of a living shoreline to restore eroded areas in the Natural Lands Trust's Mystic Island Preserve, sponsored by Little Egg Harbor Township.

    - $400,000 for the implementation of green stormwater management practices at Andujar Park in Camden, a low-lying area that drains into the city's combined sanitary-stormwater sewer system, sponsored by The Trust for Public Land.

    - $240,000 for the development of a statewide volunteer water-monitoring network to complement DEP's water-monitoring efforts, sponsored by the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association.

    - $165,000 for the second phase of developing living shorelines in Raritan Bay, specifically installation of concrete "castles" for oysters to grow on and planting of juvenile oysters along eroded salt marshes, sponsored by the New York/New Jersey Baykeeper.

    - $145,000 for the development of a mini-grant program to help farmers implement best management practices in central New Jersey's Raritan River basin, sponsored by the New Jersey Water Supply Authority.

    - $125,000 for the continuation of the Urban Watershed Education program, which provides middle-school students with classroom and field experience about nonpoint source pollution, water quality testing, fish consumption advisories and combined sewer infrastructure, sponsored by the Hackensack Riverkeeper.

    "The projects being funded by these grants serve to remind all of us of the importance of caring for our waterways," DEP Assistant Commissioner for Water Resources Managements Dan Kennedy said.

    "The public should always be mindful of the impacts their daily activities can have on the health of our waterways, as well as the fish and other aquatic life that depend on them."

    Kevin Shea may be reached at kshea@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter@kevintshea. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

    0 0

    NEWARK -- In a custom that dates back centuries in the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, Archbishop of Newark, received the pallium, a special garment symbolizing his link to the papacy of Pope Francis.   The Imposition of the Pallium Mass was held at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, where Tobin, the sixth Archbishop of...

    NEWARK -- In a custom that dates back centuries in the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, Archbishop of Newark, received the pallium, a special garment symbolizing his link to the papacy of Pope Francis.  

    The Imposition of the Pallium Mass was held at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, where Tobin, the sixth Archbishop of Newark, received the garment. 

    The woolen vestment was presented by The Most Reverend Christophe Pierre, the Apostolic Nuncio to the United States, during the afternoon Mass. The pallium is worn only by Metropolitan Archbishops, clergy who preside over an ecclesiastical province, according to information provided by Corpus Christi Parish in Hasbrouck Heights.

    The Province of New Jersey includes the Archdiocese of Newark and the Dioceses of Trenton, Camden, Paterson and Metuchen. 

    Paul Milo may be reached at pmilo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter@PaulMilo2. Find NJ.com on Facebook.  

     

     

    0 0

    Each season, at high schools across New Jersey, football players are asked to step in and fill the spots of a graduated veteran. Here are 25 players with the biggest shoes to fill in 2017


    0 0

    Check out all the schedules, scores and stories from the week.

    Following is NJ..com's mega-coverage guide for Week 2. Keep track of schedules, predictions, previews, features and breaking news from around the state all the way up until kickoff.

    ESSENTIALS

    Week 2 schedule/scoreboard
    Standings
    Statistical leaders through Sept. 10
    Power points


    THE REPLACEMENTS: 25 players with huge shoes to fill


    RANKINGS

    Top 20
    Group
    Statewide conference

    PICKS

    NJ.com predicts every winner in the state
    Predicted scores for every Top 20 game
    Predicted scores by conference


    2,168 days of losing: Can Hail Mary save N.J.'s most tortured team?


    MUST-READ CONTENT

    The replacements: 25 players with big shoes to fill
    22 bold predictions
    19 can't miss games for Week 2
    5-star recruit sitting first four games after transfer to Rahway
    Week 1 standouts
    Sayreville football coach suspended, questions ref accountability
    Meet the starters: Pope John
    Despite opening loss, Highland shows promise for season
    NJSIAA names new executive director
    HS football brawl caught on video, leads to student suspensions
    Voorhees shows balance in first shutout since 2013
    Hamilton West's Cooper finds success as kicker
    N.J. alums who made an impact during Week 2 of college football season
    Week 1 hot takes: Key results and performances from around N.J.

    COLLEGE/RECRUITING

    N.J.'s top uncommtted recruit has Ohio State ahead of Penn State
    Rutgers recap: Which future Knight made biggest on-field impact?
    Rutgers and Pitt off to fast start with 2020 Michael Alaimo
    Which N.J. players return when Morgan State plays at Rutgers?
    Mom knows best: College football star learned ropes from leading lady

    GAMES OF THE WEEK

    NJ.com/Star-Ledger:Ridge at Westfield
    South Jersey Times: Woodbury at Pennsville
    Times of Trenton: Deerfield Academy (Mass.) at Lawrenceville

    Bill Evans can be reached at bevans@njadvancemedia.com or by leaving a note in the comments below. Follow him on Twitter @BEvansSports. Find the NJ.com High School Football page on Facebook by following this link.


    0 0

    PERTH AMBOY -- A photo of Sciortino Brothers when it was located at 397 New Brunswick Ave. in Perth Amboy. MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey A 2012 article by Tom Haydon in The Star-Ledger notes that the business was founded in 1932 and was in business at the location for 71 years until 2003. In 2012, Sciortino's Pizzaria moved...

    PERTH AMBOY -- A photo of Sciortino Brothers when it was located at 397 New Brunswick Ave. in Perth Amboy.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    A 2012 article by Tom Haydon in The Star-Ledger notes that the business was founded in 1932 and was in business at the location for 71 years until 2003.

    In 2012, Sciortino's Pizzaria moved to its current location on New Brunswick Avenue in the city, two blocks from its original home.

    If you would like to share a photo that provides a glimpse of history in your community, please call 973-836-4922 or send an email to middlesex@starledger.com. And, check out more glimpses of history in our online galleries on nj.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


    0 0

    EDISON -- Myia is a 5-year-old dachshund mix at the Edison Animal Shelter. Her owners were in the process of moving when she slipped out of the house and was lost. Eventually rescued, she was emaciated when found; she has not been reclaimed. Myia is diabetic and needs insulin injections twice a day (a two-month supply costs $25). She does...

    mx0917pet.jpgMyia 

    EDISON -- Myia is a 5-year-old dachshund mix at the Edison Animal Shelter.

    Her owners were in the process of moving when she slipped out of the house and was lost.

    Eventually rescued, she was emaciated when found; she has not been reclaimed.

    Myia is diabetic and needs insulin injections twice a day (a two-month supply costs $25). She does well with other dogs and children and walks well on a leash. Myia is housetrained, neutered and vetted.

    For more information on Myia, call 732-248-7278 or visit the Edison Animal Shelter at 125 Municipal Blvd. The shelter, currently caring for 52 pets, is open Fridays through Wednesdays from noon to 4 p.m. and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    Shelters interested in placing a pet in the Paw Print adoption column or submitting news should call 973-836-4922 or email middlesex@starledger.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


    0 0

    Breaking down some of the top teams and players around N.J. from the past week.


    0 0

    A look at some of the most intriguing results in the first week of the girls soccer season.


    0 0

    Weide "David" Dai, 37, was arrested Thursday and charged with theft

    EDISON -- A township man allegedly set up a fake lumber business to pay off more than $150,000 in restaurant and bar tabs as well as other personal bills, police said. 

    weidedai.jpgWeide "David" Dai, 37, of Edison

    Weide "David" Dai, 37, was arrested Thursday and charged with one count of theft in excess of $75,000, Middlesex County Prosecutor Andrew Carey said in a release.

    Dai allegedly created the fake company to export lumber to China in April 2015, but used funds from four of businesses that invested in the venture to for his personal benefit, Carey said. 

    The Edison man is set to appear in Middlesex Superior Court on Oct. 12, according to the release. 

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips


    0 0

    She might be headed the Ocean County mall or to Old Bridge

    MANCHESTER -- Police are looking for a missing 84-year-old woman who might be at risk.

    Emily Dorio was last seen in the area of Drake Street in the Whiting section of Manchester, police said in a statement Friday afternoon.

    She is driving a white Chevrolet Malibu with New Jersey license plates CC2 8NA, police said. Dorio might confused or lost and could be en route to either the Ocean County Mall in Toms River or Old Bridge, police said.

    Police didn't release her photo or immediately respond to a message from NJ Advance Media. Anyone with information about Dorio is asked to call Manchester police at 732-657-6111.

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     


    0 0

    Trial began Thursday for a 28-year-old man accused of stalking and fatally shooting his ex-girlfriend in 2015 in South Brunswick.

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- As Alicia Martinez left her boyfriend's home in June 2015, her ex-boyfriend, Giver Vasquez, waited outside in his car.

    He had placed a GPS tracker on Martinez's vehicle and hours earlier, illegally bought a handgun and ammunition, prosecutors said.

    On that morning June 24, 2015, Vasquez followed Martinez, 24, of New Brunswick, to an industrial park where she worked on Docks Corner Road in South Brunswick. Before she got out of her car in the parking lot, Vasquez shot Martinez in the head in front of her friends and co-workers, authorities said.

    "This is nothing short of a cold-blooded execution," Assistant Prosecutor Bina Desai said Thursday during opening arguments in his trial before Judge Pedro Jimenez.

    Vasquez, 28, also from New Brunswick, confessed to the killing and was charged with murder, stalking, possession of a weapon and unlawful possession of a weapon, prosecutors said. He has pleaded not guilty in court.

    His defense attorney, Robert Corbin, told the jury there is "no question" that his client was responsible for Martinez's death. He asked the jurors, however, to consider the conditions surrounding her death and their relationship, suggesting that the crime was an act of passion, not a planned murder.

    "This is a unique case," Corbin told the jurors, saying it is not a case about who killed Martinez, but why.

    The killing was the first murder in South Brunswick since 2008 and the first time someone died by gunfire at the hands of a criminal in the township since 1989.

    Authorities have said Martinez was shot three times at about 7 a.m. that day outside the Prologis complex in the Dayton section of the township.

    After the shooting, Vasquez fled to Pennsylvania, where police arrested him the next day in New Hope. He was extradited to New Jersey, where a judge kept his bail at $2 million.

    During a previous hearing, Middlesex County Assistant Prosecutor Scott LaMountain said Vasquez was in the United States illegally. He said the two had a "tumultuous relationship."

    Alicia Martinez's brother, Marlon Martinez, has said his sister moved to the United States from Honduras when she was about 15 to escape difficult circumstances.

    "She was trying to make her American dream come true," he said in 2015. "She was very happy about her life."

    Martinez's family declined to comment Thursday outside the courtroom.

    Prosecutors will call law enforcement experts and Martinez's boyfriend and co-workers, among others, to testify at trial, she said. 

    Luke Nozicka may be reached at lnozicka@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukenozicka.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.


    0 0

    Your one-stop shop for everything football this week.

    KEY LINKS
    Week 2 mega-coverage guide
    Top 20 for Sept. 10
    • Statewide picks and schedule

    Full Week 1 schedule/scoreboard 
    • 19 can't-miss match-ups in Week 2
    22 bold predictions for Week 2

    FRIDAY FEATURED GAMES

    No. 20 Westfield at No. 19 Ridge, 7
    Ridge hosts Westfield in NJ.com/Star-Ledger Game of the Week
    Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    St. Francis (Md.) at No. 7 Don Bosco Prep, 7
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Ramsey at Pequannock, 7
    Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Cherokee at No. 6 Timber Creek, 7
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Morris Hills at Morris Knolls, 7
    Photo gallery
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Shawnee at Allentown, 7
    Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Woodbury at Pennsville, 7
    SJT Game of the Week: Pennsville meets Woodbury in Group 1 clash
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Warren Hills at North Hunterdon, 7
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Clayton at Florence, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Steinert at Lawrence, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Hightstown at Princeton, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Woodrow Wilson at Northern Burlington, 7 
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Kingsway at No. 9 Millville, 6
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Williamstown at St. Augustine, 6
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Willingboro at West Deptford, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Cedar Creek at Delsea, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Hunterdon Central at Phillipsburg, 7
    • Recap
    • Box score

    TOP 20 SCOREBOARD
    Friday
    • No. 5 Paramus Catholic vs. Seton Hall Prep, 7
    • No. 6 Timber Creek vs. Cherokee, 7
    • No. 7 Don Bosco Prep vs. St. Frances (Md.), 7
    • No. 9 Millville vs. Kingsway, 6
    • No. 10 Irvington at West Orange, 7
    • No. 11 Lenape vs. Egg Harbor, 7
    • No. 13 Rancocas Valley vs. Hammonton, 7
    • No. 14 Manalapan at Southern, 7
    • No. 15 Montclair at Livingston, 7
    • No. 16 Bridgewater-Raritan vs. Hillsborough, 7
    • No. 17 Red Bank Catholic vs. Middletown North, 7
    • No. 18 River Dell vs. Wayne Valley, 7
    • No. 20 Westfield at No. 19 Ridge, 7
    Saturday
    • No. 1 St. Joseph (Mont.) at Delbarton, 1
    • No. 3 Bergen Catholic at Mater Dei (Ca.), 10:30
    • No. 8 Pope John vs. Malvern Prep
    • No. 12 Vineland at Cherry Hill East, 11 a.m. (Pa.)

    SATURDAY FEATURED GAMES

    LIVE COVERAGE
    • Mountain Lakes at Lincoln, 12
    • Point Pleasant Boro at Lacey, 1
    • Perth Amboy at St. Joseph (Met.), 1
    • No. 3 Bergen Catholic at Mater Dei (Ca.), 10:30
    • Holy Cross at Haddonfield, 1
    • New Egypt at Gloucester Catholic, 11

    Mountain Lakes at Lincoln, 12
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Point Pleasant Boro at Lacey, 1
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Perth Amboy at St. Joseph (Met.), 1
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    No. 3 Bergen Catholic at Mater Dei (Ca.), 10:30
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Holy Cross at Haddonfield, 1
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    New Egypt at Gloucester Catholic, 11
    • Live updates
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Hopewell Valley at Nottingham, 12
    • Recap
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Clifton at Bayonne, 1
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Hamilton West at Steinert, 11
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Robbinsville at Audubon, 11
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Ewing at Pemberton, 1
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Deerfield (Ma.) at Lawrence, 2:30
    • Recap
    • Box score

    Haddon Heights at Penns Grove, 12
    • Recap
    • Box score

    COMPLETE STATEWIDE SCHEDULE/SCOREBOARD

    Jeremy Schneider may be reached at jschneider@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @J_Schneider. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


    0 0

    As sad as they were, last year's kill figures were down from 2015


    0 0

    Key highlights - from upset wins to monster individual games and fantastic finishes - from around the state.


    0 0

    Timothy Eosso sued the township accusing the fire chief of harassing him and failing to accommodate his medical condition

    EDISON -- The township and one of its firefighters have settled a discrimination lawsuit with a $175,000 payout to the employee, according to records. 

    Timothy Eosso, who was hired by the Edison Fire Department in 1996, sued the township accusing the fire chief of harassing him and failing to accommodate his medical condition of attention deficit disorder, according to the lawsuit filed in 2014. 

    On Wednesday evening, the Edison council approved the settlement of $175,000 as the case was set to go to trial, according to township and court documents.

    Roughly 4.4 percent of adults have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to the federal government.   

    Eosso, who is still employed by Edison with an annual salary of $117,623, said in the suit that he complained "several" times about the fire chief, Brian Latham, to Mayor Thomas Lankey and also filed formal harassment complaints throughout 2013. 

    The suit claims Eosso was transferred to a different firehouse in January 2014 and put on a different shift in the months after his complaints. Eosso says in the suit that the move was unlawful and the transfer failed to accommodate his medical condition. 

    In addition, the suit accuses the deputy chief of violating township and state guidelines involving the testing and promotion of firefighters. 

    Eosso is the son of former township personnel director Barbara Eosso. His attorney did not return calls for this story. 

    Edison officials declined to comment.

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips


    0 0

    Dogs and cats from around New Jersey looking for permanent homes.

    Some pet information from Joybird Furniture that just doesn't fit anywhere else:

    * Females are 21% more likely than males to allow their pets on the furniture.

    * Men are 1.5 times more likely to spend more than $100 on their pet each month.

    * Many women prefer to have their pet sleep in bed with them while most men have their pet sleep outside.

    Here's a gallery of pets throughout the Garden State that await adoption at shelters and rescues.


older | 1 | .... | 258 | 259 | (Page 260) | 261 | 262 | .... | 360 | newer