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    Who knew balogna had a first name?

    gh-type.jpgSome had it goin' ON in the '70s ... and then, there were folks like me. 

    I grew up in the '70s.

    So, as a guy who went from pre-teen to adult during the decade, I'd like to share a few random facts about those good ole days:

    * The population of the U.S. in 1970 was 204,879,000, the national debt was $450 billion and the average annual salary was approximately $7,800 per year.

    * The Beatles kicked off the decade by announcing they were splitting up in April 1970. Bummer.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    * What could be termed the greatest one-hit-wonder of all time came in the 1970s with Don McLean's "American Pie" in 1972. Plenty of people know every word of the song, which runs 8 minutes, 33 seconds.

    * Advertising led to catchphrases that were repeated ad nauseum, including "Please don't squeeze the Charmin," "I can't believe I ate the whole thing!" "Flick your Bic," "Is it live or is it Memorex?" ... and we learned that our bologna had a first name, O-S-C-A-R.

    * As if one oil crisis (1973) wasn't enough, we had another one in 1979, and, I'll admit it now, I switched license plates a couple of times so I could buy gas on "even" and "odd" days.

    Here's a gallery of New Jersey in the 1970s. And here are links to other galleries you might find interesting.

    Vintage photos of the 1940s in N.J.

    Vintage photos of the 1950s in N.J.

    Vintage photos of the 1960s in N.J.

    Vintage photos of N.J. in the 1960s

    More vintage photos of the 1970s in NJ

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    The food store chain newest location in North Brunswick will fill a 14,500-square-foot space in the North Village Shopping Center on Route 1.

    NORTH BRUNSWICK -- Trader Joe's will open the doors to its first store in Middlesex County Thursday night.

    The food store chain newest location in North Brunswick will fill a 14,500-square-foot space in the North Village Shopping Center on Route 1. 

    On Wednesday, NJ Advance Media got a sneak peek of the grocery store. 

    "We are pleased to welcome a Trader Joe's grocery store to the North Brunswick community," Mayor Francis Womack said in a statement when the store announced its plan to move to the town. 

    This will be Trader Joe's 13th spot in the state. 

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips


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    Levi Ware can play. He can make a simple ukulele sound like a 12-string guitar. But the magic of his music isn't in his hands. It's in his heart. That was pretty clear as he sang to three ill children and their families Tuesday at St. Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick. The kids were shy at first, but...

    Levi Ware can play. He can make a simple ukulele sound like a 12-string guitar. But the magic of his music isn't in his hands. It's in his heart.

    That was pretty clear as he sang to three ill children and their families Tuesday at St. Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick. The kids were shy at first, but Ware warmed them up with his songs and by playfully interacting with them.

    At one point, he brought a smile to the face of Vienna D'Agostino, 5, whose mother, Carrie, was bouncing a tambourine off the little girl's foot.

    "I've never seen somebody play the tambourine with their foot before!" he said to Vienna, who had been in the hospital for 18 days.

    MORE: Recent Mark Di Ionno columns

    This little concert was the East Coast debut of Ware's Melodic Caring Project, which has live-streamed free concerts into the hospital rooms of 3,000 terminally or gravely ill children, primarily on the West Coast, since 2013. 

    "Once we got going, we always knew we wanted to expand to the East Coast and Nashville," Ware said.

    Ware is a Seattle-area songwriter and guitarist who played with the band Vast Capital, which toured with Pearl Jam, The Spin Doctors and other headliners. He's also released two solo albums.

    But fame isn't everything. 

    "I always wanted my music to be impactful," he said. "Now it's impactful in a way I never imagined. My world just fell into place."

    What follows is a story about like-minded people finding one another through happenstance and serendipity to do some good in the world.

    It begins with Ware, 41, who was one of those workaday musicians, plugging away at their passion and craft, never making it big but doing what they love. And that usually means holding down another job to pay the bills. For Ware, it was carpentry and construction as he and his wife Stephanie raised their three children.

    But fate interceded in the most inspiring and generous way and Ware was smart and sensitive enough to embrace it.

    This story begins a few years ago with a sick 11-year-old girl in Ware's hometown of Mount Vernon in Washington State.

    "A friend of mine, Ryan Barci, was her middle school teacher and wanted to do something," Ware said. "I said, 'Let's do a concert for her.' "

    A local theater was booked, musicians and stage help volunteered and all 300 tickets were sold for the Concert for Kaydee (Curbow). On the night of the show, everyone showed but Kaydee.

    "She was rushed to the hospital," Ware said. "But we were all there for her and we figured out a way for her to still see it."

    Ware grabbed a laptop, and using a Wi-Fi signal from the coffee shop next door, streamed the concert into Kaydee's hospital room.

    "We all wanted her to know she wasn't alone," he said. "When we saw how it lifted her, we realized this is pretty powerful."

    Kaydee Curbow was 11 then. Today she is in remission from her cancer. 

    After the Concert for Kaydee, Ware did several more shows for kids in hospitals, and then enlisted more Seattle-area musicians to get involved.

    He and his wife, Stephanie, launched Melodic Caring Project in 2013.

    And then things just took off. Word spread, more hospitals liked the idea, and more artists signed up -- some you've heard of. The Black-Eyed Peas. Jason Mraz. David Crosby. Graham Nash. Switchfoot.

    "Almost everybody we asked said yes," Ware said. "There's no downside."

    "I think Jason Mraz really was what helped us go global," said Evan Blackstone, a veteran rock manager, now vice president of Melodic Caring. "He really got it."

    These are not impersonal concerts. The artists perform for small groups of kids, know each by name, and interact with them via a laptop. The concerts are free for hospitals and patients.

    And now the organization has come East thanks to a chance meeting at The Stone Pony between St. Peter's University Hospital cardiologist Nidhi Kumar and a producer for the organization.

    Ware's ukulele concert was part of a whirlwind day, arranged by Kumar, with several New Jersey and New York hospitals, where she connected Ware to several of her friends and colleagues.

    Earlier this year, Kumar launched an initiative called the Wellness Project, part of another program  called Art Heals. They're so new she hasn't yet created a website for them.

    "I'm very bad about social media," she said. "I'm more about getting people together, talking and looking for better ways to help people not get sick or heal."

    Kumar aligned the Wellness Project to help support Elijah's Promise, the long-time New Brunswick soup kitchen which expanded into a job-training program with a culinary school and catering service. At a fundraiser for Elijah's Promise at The Stone Pony in September, she met Peter Bowers, a guy with a long resume in the music industry, and a current producer of the PBS show "Landmarks Live in Concert." He told her about Melodic Caring. She promptly offered a helping hand.

    "Everyone is interested in this," she said. "Music has so many healing and soothing qualities."

    She cited studies where music therapy reduces pain, lowers blood pressure and lessens anxiety.

    Sara Kropoth, a music therapist at St. Peter's, says it is especially good for ill children.

    "For kids that are here for long-term treatment, learning an instrument is a nice distraction from their illness," said Kropoth, who came to the concert with a bag of bongos, tambourines, maracas and rain sticks, and passed them out to the families.

    "It normalizes the hospital experience and gives them an outlet for expression."

    For a sick child, like any musician, those expressions can range from joy and relief, to sadness and anger -- a universal language for universal feelings.

    Mark Di Ionno may be reached at mdiionno@starledger.com. Follow The Star-Ledger on Twitter @StarLedger and find us on Facebook.


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  • 10/12/17--07:03: Fall Fest at animal shelter
  • EAST BRUNSWICK -- New Beginnings Animal Rescue will host a "Moonlight Fall Fest" on Oct. 20 from 5 to 8 p.m. DJ Mike the Apeman will provide entertainment and host a trivia contest. Pets are welcome at the event, which will include activities for children such as pumpkin painting. All proceeds will benefit the animals in the care of the...

    599494fee40a1.image.jpg 

    EAST BRUNSWICK -- New Beginnings Animal Rescue will host a "Moonlight Fall Fest" on Oct. 20 from 5 to 8 p.m.

    DJ Mike the Apeman will provide entertainment and host a trivia contest. Pets are welcome at the event, which will include activities for children such as pumpkin painting.

    All proceeds will benefit the animals in the care of the nonprofit shelter at 706-R Cranbury Road in East Brunswick. For more information, call 732-238-1348.

    Shelters interested in placing a pet in the Paw Print adoption column or submitting news should call 973-836-4922 or email middlesex@starledger.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    This week's list of bold predictions features upset picks, winning streaks and close finishes that could affect playoff races.


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    The melee involved at least four players and the coach, and marks the second time in less than three months police have been called to the school for physical altercations among football team members.

    The father of top New Jersey football recruit Dorian Hardy said his son was punched in the face by an assistant coach during a brawl that erupted after practice at Paramus Catholic High School last Friday.

    At least four Paladins players and assistant coach Michael Mitchell were involved in the melee, according to accounts from parents and a police report obtained by NJ Advance Media. Mitchell also is the father of a Paramus Catholic player involved in the altercation.

    Hardy’s father, Charles Hardy, said his son “came to the aid” of a teammate who was hit with a helmet and dazed during the fight. Once the fight was broken up, Mitchell then “punched Dorian twice in the face,” Charles Hardy said.


    RELATED: N.J.'s top DE Dorian Hardy commits to Penn State during visit


    Dorian Hardy, a 6-foot-5, 245-pound defensive end, is a four-star recruit with more than 30 NCAA Division 1 scholarship offers. He has verbally committed to play next year for Penn State.

    Both Hardy and another top recruit involved in the fight — senior running back Jonathan Clark, who has committed to Central Michigan University — have left the school, their parents said.

    Charles Hardy’s account of the altercation differs from the narrative described by Paramus police. The physical altercation began around 5:24 p.m. when a player believed to be Dorian Hardy started to pull on another player’s jersey, records say. A teacher intervened in the hallway and broke up the fight, but it continued outside, prompting two other players and Mitchell to join in, the report said.

    The fight was broken up by 5:27 p.m., according to the report.

    A 14-year-old player involved in the fight had visible swelling to his face, the report stated. It also said that Mitchell “became involved in the altercation,” but it did not say he threw punches.

    No charges have been filed at this point, police said.

    The incident was reported to police by Paramus Catholic head coach Dan Sabella around 9:30 p.m. last Friday, according to the report.

    Sabella and Paramus Catholic athletic director Scott Langan declined comment when reached by phone Wednesday.

    Jim Goodness, director of communications for the Archdiocese of Newark, which oversees Paramus Catholic, said his office was “aware of the incident.”

    “I also have been advised that everything according to procedures is being followed and the school is dealing with it internally,” he said.

    Goodness declined to say whether Mitchell or any of the players involved had been disciplined.


    RELATED: Paramus Catholic football adds top-level transfers to team


    Charles Hardy said his son, Clark and Mitchell have all been suspended by Paramus Catholic.

    Clark has transferred to Hackensack and Hardy is determining where to enroll next. It is unclear if they will be eligible to play football this season for new schools.

    Clark’s father, Jonathan Strickland, said his son was trying to break up the fight when he was hit in the back with a helmet by a teammate.

    Strickland also said Dorian Hardy was punched twice in the face by Mitchell.

    Both Strickland and Charles Hardy were critical of the Paramus Catholic coaching staff and Sabella. Charles Hardy said the head coach has not defended his son or Clark to school officials and is placing their future football careers in jeopardy.

    “It’s a travesty that Coach Sabella didn’t stand behind his players,” Charles Hardy said. “I feel as though he threw his players under the bus. Most coaches stand by their players. They want the best for these young men. You don’t do that by throwing them under the bus. These kids have potential scholarships at risk now.”


    RELATED: Assistant coach allegedly knocks out former player at scrimmage


    Last week’s football brawl at Paramus Catholic comes less than three months after former Paladins volunteer assistant coach Ed Tedesco allegedly struck former backup quarterback Derick Suazo, 19, in the face and knocked him unconscious during a 7-on-7 scrimmage at the school. Paramus police also responded to that altercation and actively investigated.

    When asked if the Archdiocese is concerned about the state of the Paramus Catholic football program, Goodness said, “We’re always concerned about the safety of students.”

    The recent altercations come on the heels of several years of positive publicity for Paramus Catholic football, which has won three state championships since 2012, including last year’s Non-Public, Group 4 title.

    The school recently produced 2017 NFL first round draft pick Jabrill Peppers and current Michigan star defensive end Rashan Gary. The team’s former coach until 2014, Chris Partridge, is now the linebackers coach and special teams coordinator at Michigan.

    This year’s Paramus Catholic team is struggling and off to a 2-4 start, including a 43-7 blowout loss to Pope John last Saturday, the day after the brawl.

    Another talented player, junior Darren Fields, also left Paramus Catholic this week and transferred to Irvington, according to his mother, Tasha Fields. Darren Fields was not involved in the fight, but decided to leave the school after having a verbal altercation with Sabella during last week’s Pope John game, his mother said.

    “I just didn’t feel safe with my son being at that school anymore,” Tasha Fields said.

    Matthew Stanmyre may be reached at mstanmyre@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @MattStanmyre. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Todderick Hunt may be reached at thunt@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TodderickHunt. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    A look at the top sophomores in New Jersey.


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    The Edison teen's former classmates at J.P. Stevens in Edison have said they will wear blue to honor the teen

    METUCHEN -- The 17-year-old who was shocked by high voltage lines on a train trestle Tuesday is hospitalized with burns on 70 percent of his body and broken bones, his grandmother said. 

    The Edison teen's former classmates at J.P. Stevens in Edison have said they will wear blue to honor the teen, identified on social media as Lance Vargas, when the football team plays Perth Amboy High on Friday.

    His grandmother said on Facebook that he was taken to St. Barnabas Medical Center's burn unit, where he is listed as critical but stable, according to the hospital. 

    Vargas fell 30 feet Tuesday afternoon climbing a train trestle near St. Joseph High School after coming in contact with the high voltage lines, police said.

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

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    The former vice president spoke at Rutgers' "It's On Us" event to raise awareness about sexual assault on college campuses. Watch video

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- Media mogul Harvey Weinstein "used his power in a disgusting and immoral way" and deserves to face legal consequences, former Vice President Joe Biden said Thursday in a passionate speech on sexual assault at Rutgers University.

    Speaking before more than 2,100 students in the College Avenue Gym in New Brunswick, Biden praised the actresses and other alleged victims who have spoken out against Weinstein in recent weeks.

    "This disgusting behavior at least on the part of Harvey Weinstein has been brought to an abrupt and justifiable end," Biden said as the crowd cheered. "And it is my hope there are more consequences."

    Biden speaks at Rutgers (PHOTOS)

    The former vice president said he hopes some of the statutes of limitations have not run out on the alleged sexual assault cases, so Weinstein -- one of Biden's former political donors -- can be prosecuted.

    "This man deserves more than losing his company," Biden said.

    Biden's appearance at the raucous event was part of the "It's On Us" campaign, which he started with President Barack Obama in 2014 after a White House task force recommended ways to prevent sexual violence on campus.

    The former vice president has made a string of fiery speeches on college campuses imploring both men and women to speak up and take responsibility for the culture of rape and sexual assault on college campuses and in the rest of the country.

    Many at the event were waiting to see if Biden would mention the allegations against Weinstein, who was once one of the biggest public supporters of the Obama-Biden campaign.

    Weinstein was the subject of explosive stories in the New York Times and the New Yorker accusing him of sexual harassment and sexual assault of young women over three decades. He has denied the allegations of sexual assault, but admitted he needs to go to rehab to change his behavior. 

    Biden said men were too silent about Weinstein and similar behavior in Hollywood.

    "It is long past time for the powerful men in Hollywood to speak up," Biden said. "Silence is complicity."

    Rutgers recently accepted a $100,000 donation from Weinstein and his family's foundation for the university's new Gloria Steinem Chair in Media, Culture, and Feminist Studies.

    University officials have said they plan to keep Weinstein's donation. On Tuesday, they reaffirmed that decision despite the reports of rape allegations against Weinstein.

    Devoting the $100,000 donation to advancing women's equality "is a better use of the dollars than returning the donation to Harvey Weinstein and the H. Weinstein Family Foundation," the university said in a statement.

    Rutgers has been expanding its efforts to support victims of sexual violence, including using a $2 million federal grant to expand training and education on campus.

    In 2016, 23 rapes were reported on the Rutgers-New Brunswick campus, according to campus crime statistics. All except one allegedly occurred in campus residence halls.

    Biden, who spoke at Rutgers for free, appeared in support of Rutgers' End Sexual Violence Campaign and Turn the Campus Purple Week, an initiative where people display a purple light in windows to raise awareness about dating violence. 

    Students who were able to get free tickets stood in a long line that circled the block to see Biden speak. Several prominent New Jersey Democrats -- including State Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, and state Senator Loretta Weinberg, D-Bergen -- were also in the crowd.

    Before Biden's speech, the crowd heard from a string of campus officials and students who spoke about sexual assault on campus.

    Some of the loudest applause at the event was for a group of female students who listed facts about the abuse of women on college campuses, in fraternity houses and in the rest of the world. They referenced President Donald Trump's "Access Hollywood" tape demeaning women. 

    "Fact: Our president is as abuser," the student speakers said, drawing sustained cheering from the crowd.

    Biden also referenced Trump in his speech.

    "I know our President talks about 'locker room talk.' They didn't talk that way in my locker room," said Biden, a former college football player, to loud cheers.

    Other students stood before the crowd and told their personal stories, including a student who said she was drugged with a spiked drink at a party and raped. It took her years to report the assault, she said.

    Another student told the crowd she was raped by two different boyfriends and now suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. Others recounted being raped while still in high school.

    The event was lined with counselors in purple t-shirts ready to speak to sexual assault survivors and others in the crowd upset by the speakers.

    After his speech, Biden stayed in the gym for more than an hour taking selfies with students, including some who urged him to run for president in 2020. Before he left, Biden climbed onto the bleachers, pumped his fist and urged the remaining students to speak up for their generation. 

    "Your country needs you," Biden told the remaining crowd, promising to come back to Rutgers. "Don't give up. Stay engaged."

    Kelly Heyboer may be reached at kheyboer@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @KellyHeyboer. Find her at KellyHeyboerReporter on Facebook.

     
    Gallery preview 

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    Former Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday campaigned for Democratic New Jersey governor nominee Phil Murphy. Watch video

    EDISON -- Former Vice President Joe Biden is never one to mince words.

    And on Thursday, he had a few choice ones for a controversial new campaign ad from Kim Guadagno, the Republican nominee for New Jersey governor, calling it the "return of Willie Horton."

    Stumping for Democratic nominee Phil Murphy at the Sheraton in Edison, Biden blamed Republicans like President Donald Trump and Gov. Chris Christie for allowing "gutter politics" to rise up in America. 

    Then, without mentioning her specifically by name, Biden drew attention to the television ad that Guadagno, Christie's lieutenant governor, released Wednesday.

    The ad alleges that Murphy -- the former U.S. ambassador to Germany who is leading Guadagno by double digits in all polls -- would protect undocumented immigrants who commit crimes, including "deranged murderers."

    Guadagno attacks Murphy in new ad. Murphy calls it 'vile.'

    "I just saw it on a laptop," Biden told a crowd of a few hundred Murphy supporters in the hotel's ballroom. "The return of Willie Horton." 

    Biden added "there's a reason" polls show Trump is unpopular in New Jersey and Murphy is ahead in the race to succeed Christie.

    "People are sick and tired," Biden said. "They want to raise the standard of dialogue."

    Biden added that electing Murphy, a former Goldman Sachs banking executive who spent years as a top Democrat fundraiser, is critical because governors will be on the frontline fighting Trump. 

    "We have got to send a message all across America and around the world: New Jersey is back and America is on their way back to get rid of this circumstance we have," Biden said.

    Numerous other Democrats have denounced Guadagno's ad. State Sen. Richard Codey, D-Essex, said it was "race-baiting," while New Jersey Democratic State Committee Chairman John Currie called it "a load of crap."

    Murphy has repeatedly said he would help protect undocumented immigrants in New Jersey from Trump's policies. During a debate Tuesday, Murphy said, "if need be," he'd even go as far to make New Jersey "a sanctuary not just city but state."

    In Guadagno's ad, a narrator suggests that Murphy would protect people like Jose Carranza, a Peruvian immigrant in the country illegally who was convicted in 2007 in the killings of three friends in a Newark schoolyard. Carranza was previously arrested for raping a child and released on bail. 

    The ad then references comments Murphy made last month at a town hall co-hosted by NJ Advance Media. Murphy was asked about Carranza and at which point he believes state authorities should notify federal immigration officials about when undocumented immigrants are being held in custody. 

    Murphy replied that "my bias is going to be having their back" -- a line Guadagno uses in the ad.

    But Guadagno's commercial does not include what Murphy said next: that what Carranza did was "heinous" and "we've got to be careful to not extrapolate that and then throw a similar blanket over a whole group of folks."

    Guadagno's campaign didn't back down Thursday.

    "The ad uses Phil Murphy's own words," Woodcliff Lake Mayor Carlos Rendo, Guadagno's pick of lieutenant governor -- who is Hispanic -- said in a statement. "He wants to make New Jersey a sanctuary state even though three African-American children died at the hands of a child rapist who wasn't deported."

    "Kim and I understand we must have the backs of law-abiding New Jerseyans and law enforcement over violent criminals, and we both stand by the ad," Rendo added.

    Biden's "Willie Horton" remark is a reference to an infamous ad from the 1988 presidential election between then-Vice President George H.W. Bush, the Republican nominee, and then-Massachusetts Gov. Michal Dukakis, the Democrat.

    The ad blamed Dukakis for an incident in which Horton, a black convicted killer, raped a woman while out of prison on a weekend furlough. Critics denounced the ad as racist. 

    Earlier Thursday, Guadagno released a statement mocking Biden's appearance with Murphy.

    "Joe Biden says that paying higher taxes is 'patriotic,'" Guadagno said. "Well, if Phil Murphy becomes governor, we'll be the most patriotic state in the country." 

    Murphy has proposed raising some taxes by $1.3 billion to pay for education, pensions, and more -- including hiking taxes on the wealthy, closing corporate loopholes, and taxing legalized marijuana. He says he would spare the middle class. 

    While running for vice president in 2008, Biden said that wealthier Americans should pay more in taxes because "it's time to be patriotic ... to help get American out of the rut."

    Brent Johnson may be reached at bjohnson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @johnsb01. Find NJ.com Politics on Facebook.


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    The Diocese of Metuchen held its 16th annual ceremony at the Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi.

    METUCHEN -- Hundreds of federal, state, county and local police officers attended the Diocese of Metuchen's 16th annual Blue Mass on Thursday at the Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi. 

    Bishop James F. Crecchio was the principal celebrant of the Mass, which honors all active, retired and deceased law enforcement personnel from the four counties served by the diocese, Middlesex, Hunterdon, Somerset and Warren.

    Det. Matthew Tarentino, who served with the Summit Police Department and lost his life in the line of duty in May, was specifically honored at the Mass.

    The Woodbridge Police Department was, as the host department this year, assuming leading liturgical roles during the Mass, such as serving as cross and candle bearers, readers and gift bearers.

    The Mass included a 21-gun salute, 'Amazing Grace played by pipes and drums, and the playing of taps. Afterwards, there was a flyover by a State Police aircraft as the bishop blessed the officers.

    Patti Sapone may be reached at psapone@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Instagram @psapo, Twitter @psapone.  Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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  • 10/13/17--05:06: Shepherd-mix pups are shy
  • MIDDLESEX -- Nicholas and Nemo are 4-month-old pups in the care of Island Puppy Rescue. Brothers who are almost identical, they are likely shepherd mixes and should each grow to about 50 pounds. Ideally, these shy puppies should be adopted together, but the rescue group will consider separate adoptions. Both have been neutered and are up-to-date on shots. For more...

    nicholas nemo.jpgNicholas and Nemo 

    MIDDLESEX -- Nicholas and Nemo are 4-month-old pups in the care of Island Puppy Rescue.

    Brothers who are almost identical, they are likely shepherd mixes and should each grow to about 50 pounds.

    Ideally, these shy puppies should be adopted together, but the rescue group will consider separate adoptions. Both have been neutered and are up-to-date on shots.

    For more information or to arrange to meet Nicholas and Nemo, email islandpups@msn.com or call 908-720-5167. Island Puppy Rescue is a nonprofit organization working to save homeless and mistreated animals from the Caribbean; the group is currently caring for three dogs. For more information, go to islandpuppyrescue.org.

    Shelters interested in placing a pet in the Paw Print adoption column or submitting news should call 973-836-4922 or email middlesex@starledger.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Which boys have already given their verbal commit to play men's soccer?


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    EAST BRUNSWICK -- This photo, which shows motorists lined up for gas at a station in East Brunswick, was taken in 1974 during an oil crisis. MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey According to history.state.gov, "During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) imposed an embargo against the United States in retaliation for...

    EAST BRUNSWICK -- This photo, which shows motorists lined up for gas at a station in East Brunswick, was taken in 1974 during an oil crisis.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    According to history.state.gov, "During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) imposed an embargo against the United States in retaliation for the U.S. decision to re-supply the Israeli military and to gain leverage in the post-war peace negotiations."

    If you would like to share a photo that provides a glimpse of history in your community, please call 973-836-4922 or send an email to middlesex@starledger.com. And, check out more glimpses of history in our online galleries on nj.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Get caught up instantly on NJ.com's high school football coverage of Week 6 with the mega-coverage guide

    Below is NJ.com's mega-coverage guide for Week 6. Keep track of schedules, predictions, previews, features and breaking news from around the state all the way up until kickoff.

    ESSENTIALS 
    Midseason awards: N.J.'s best at midway point
     25 must-see high school football games for Week 6

    Week 6 schedule/scoreboard
    Schedule/scoreboard by conference
    Statewide stat leaders through Week 5
    NJSIAA football power points after Week 5
    Statewide standings through Week 5


    UPDATE: ‘They tried to kill my son.’ Frosh parents say star players caused PC brawl


    RANKINGS 
    Top 20
    Group and conference rankings

    PICKS 
    NJ.com predicts every winner in the state
    Scores and predictions for Top 20 teams
    Picks for each of N.J.'s six conferences 


    PLUS: Midseason awards: N.J.'s best at midway point


    MUST-READ CONTENT 
    • Midseason awards: N.J.'s best at midway point
    • ‘They tried to kill my son.’ Frosh parents say star players caused PC brawl
    • Playing with heart: How N.J. teen went from death’s door back to football field
    • Piscataway survives a scare and 21 more bold predictions for N.J. football Week 6
    • ‘The whole town is ready for football’: Michael Cipot ignites No. Brunswick
    • SJT Game of the Week: Highland's challenging schedule continues with improved Sterling
    New Jersey's 43 undefeated football teams after Week 5
    • Concussions in football: 21 recent developments you need to know in 2017
    • West Deptford's Collier has grown -- literally and figuratively
    • Hunterdon County football update: South Hunterdon breaks 16-game losing streak; County stat leaders
    • The 12th Man TD Club of Trenton announces weekly football honors
    • Times of Trenton Football Players of the Week: Hun's Henderson, Trenton's Alfred
    • After 200th win, South River coach Rich Marchesi more focused on 5th state title
    • High school football triple-header scheduled for Saturday at Rutgers
    • Times of Trenton Football Notebook: Lawrence gets back on the right track
    • Former 'benchwarmer' WR, soph Kavon Lewis puts up elite stats as Penns Grove QB
    • WATCH: Bosco football player's vicious hit on ex-teammate intensifies feud with SJR

    A LOOK BACK AT WEEK 5

    Results and links for Week 5
    Who were the best N.J. football players last week? Here are 50 Week 5 stars

    N.J. football hot takes: Thrilling finishes highlight wild Week 5
     Week 5 stat leaders 
    •  Best photos from Week 5

    RECRUITING NEWS  
    Film review: Breaking down Rutgers QB commit Zamar Wise's junior mid-season highlights
    • Which Rutgers football recruits put forth top performances this past weekend?
    • Film review: Breaking down 5-star N.J. junior DL Antonio Alfano's 2017 debut
    • What have N.J.'s top 50 football recruits been up to?

    Joe Zedalis may be reached at jzedalis@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @josephzedalis. Like NJ.com HS sports on Facebook.


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    The crash occurred near Exit 54.

    SUMMIT -- A tractor-trailer struck a car Friday morning on Interstate 78, injuring at least one person, police said.

    The tractor-trailer, according to police, struck a 2006 gold Toyota Camry at around 9 a.m. on the westbound side near Exit 54, police said.

    The crash caused multiple lane closures, including local and express lanes, according to police.

    The person, whose age and town are not known, was taken to University Hospital in Newark. Authorities did not know the seriousness of the injury or which vehicle the injured person was in.

    Spencer Kent may be reached at skent@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @SpencerMKent. Find the Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    The expanded probe into Officer Joseph Reiman's use of force comes three days after NJ Advance Media published an investigation into the officer's use of force during arrests. Watch video

    CARTERET -- The prosecutor's office will review a Carteret police officer's use-of-force history and the department's training and policies in its case against the cop over the alleged violent arrest of a teenager.

    Assistant Prosecutor Christine D'Elia said in court Friday her investigator was putting together a report on Carteret officer Joseph Reiman's use-of-force history and expects the additional discovery to be finished by next week. The two sides are due back in court on Nov 17.

    The expanded probe comes three days after NJ Advance Media published an investigation into Reiman's use-of-force records. In his 23 months on the force, Reiman accounted for more than one-fifth of the department's incidents where police used force, such as a punch, baton or weapon against a suspect. 

    The officer's attorney, Charles Sciarra, called the article "shameful," saying the reporting lacked the context of the department's individual arrest numbers. Experts told NJ Advance Media that 24 incidents where force was used in less than two years was "excessive."

    Reiman, 31, faces a charge of assault and three counts of official misconduct in the arrest of a 16-year-old on May 31, when the teen says the officer beat him. 

    Sciarra rejected the state's plea deal of three years in prison Friday after Reiman, brother of Carteret Mayor Daniel Reiman and borough police officer Charles Reiman, appeared in Superior Court before Judge Joseph Paone for a post-indictment conference.

    Sciarra claims the charges are a politically and personally motivated attack over an incident two years ago where the mayor and Middlesex County Prosecutor Andrew Carey exchanged words.

    -50cc1bf64432dc27.JPGJoseph Reiman appears in court on Aug. 24, 2017. 

    The spat was spurred by the mayor's statements to the press about a body found in Carteret in January of 2015, according to a letter from Carey obtained by NJ Advance Media. The prosecutor says Reiman was "very rude and disrespectful" when he called the mayor about his public comments that may have affected an ongoing investigation, according to the letter.

    "lt is my understanding that this is not the first investigation involving a death in which you have inappropriately made public comments," Carey wrote in the letter. "ln the event that you actively impede any ongoing criminal investigation, you may be subject to criminal arrest."

    Sciarra said he plans to file a motion to have the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office removed from the case. 

    Joseph Reiman, who was indicted on Sept. 28, has been suspended with pay pending the criminal charges, which stem from the arrest of an unlicensed teen, who crashed his parents' car after a brief police chase. 

    NJ Advance Media first reported the encounter after interviews with the teen and neighbor, who said he witnessed the arrest. The teen's parents say the boy has only been cited for traffic violations and has not been charged with a crime. 

    The prosecutor's office has released four dashcam videos from the arrest showing Reiman climbing on top of the teenager and punching him for more than a minute.

    Sciarra said he plans to dispute that the teen's injuries were the result of the arrest, arguing that the 16-year-old injured himself in the crash when the car smashed into a utility pole's suspension wire. 

    D'Elia has argued that the teen's injuries were not consistent with an accident but with an assault.

    Reiman was hired in July of 2015 as a disabled veteran after serving four tours in Iraq and Afghanistan in the U.S. Marine Corps, according to state and federal records. 

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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    The ex-Bayway Lumber salesman got a year in prison

    TRENTON -- A former salesman for a lumber and hardware distributor who admitted defrauding customers and lying to a grand jury was sentenced Thursday to a year in prison.

    Adam Martignetti, 44, of South River, gave away iPads, a laptop and patio furniture to employees of companies that were customers of Bayway Lumber in Linden, but then Martignetti added the cost of those "gifts" to each company's bill, authorities said.

    U.S. District Judge Peter G. Sheridan issued the sentenced in a federal court in Trenton, the U.S. Attorney's Office said in a statement. 

    Corrupt lumber supplier gets prison time

    Customers such as Amtrak, the city of Elizabeth and the Plainfield board of education were then overbilled, authorities said. 

    Martignetti previously admitting lying to a federal grand jury. He claimed he never gave items for free to Elizabeth city employees. 

    His boss, Robert Dattilo, the part owner of Bayway Lumber previously pleaded guilty for orchestrating the scheme and was sentenced to 48 months in prison. Dattilo was also ordered to pay $708,386 in restitution.

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    Hardy Sannoh, 60, of New Brunswick, was arrested over the incident and charged with endangering the welfare of the child

    NEW BRUNSWICK -- A bus driver has been charged with leaving a 9-year-old autistic child on a school bus for four hours Thursday, according to authorities. 

    Hardy Sannoh, 60, of New Brunswick, was arrested and faces a charge of endangering the welfare of the child, Middlesex County Prosecutor Andrew Carey said in a release. 

    Sannoh, a school bus driver from Accurate Transportation in Piscataway, drove the child to school in Piscataway Thursday morning but never escorted the 9-year-old off the bus, leaving him unattended from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., according to the release.

    The child was then returned home without telling the parents, according to Carey. 

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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    Who has impressed at midway point of the soccer season?


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