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    There is a new No. 1 at 152 pounds plus other changes in the second NJ.com weight class rankings of 2018.


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    John Horn, 56, was wanted in connection on an outstanding warrant for his alleged role in a four-state money laundering and racketing ring.

    horn.jpegJohn Horn 

    A New Jersey man on the state's most wanted fugitive list has been picked up by authorities in Middlesex County, according to authorities. 

    John Horn, 56, was wanted in connection on an outstanding warrant for his alleged role in a four-state money laundering and racketing ring. 

    Horn was arrested on Jan. 3 by Carteret and county authorities, according to Andrea Boulton, a spokeswoman for the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office. 

    Authorities named Horn along with 46 others in an October 2016 indictment that charged the group in an operation that ripped off residents and businesses. Carlos Alcantara, 26, of South Amboy, is accused of running the fraud ring, which allegedly involved 44 companies. 

    Horn is currently being held in Middlesex County jail, Boulton said. 

    The details of his arrest were not immediately made public. 

    Horn's last contact with Middlesex County Sheriffs before his arrests was on Aug. 10, 2016. He faces charges of racketeering, money laundering, theft by deception, and receiving stolen property. 

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips


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    University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro is changing to Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center

    Princeton HealthCare facilities, including their 308-bed hospital in Plainsboro, officially joined the University of Pennsylvania Health System Tuesday - better known as Penn Medicine.

    Both organizations announced that the deal, first announced in December 2016, had received all necessary regulatory approvals.

    The names of the Princeton HealthCare facilities are changing, the announcement said.

    The system will be known as Penn Medicine Princeton Health, and the hospital will be called Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center. (It had been known as University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.)

    Other Princeton HealthCare name changes can be viewed here.

    "This is a significant day in our history, and we look forward to being an even stronger organization, clinically and financially, as we continue to fulfill our almost century-old mission of serving this community," Princeton Health President and CEO Barry S. Rabner said in the statement.

    Kim Pimley, chair of Princeton HealthCare's board of trustees, said it's the end of a two-year process to evaluate the best partner for the health system.

    "In Penn Medicine, we found a partner that shares our values. Together, we can make world-class care more accessible to the people in the communities we serve. We are delighted to begin a shared future with Penn Medicine," Pimley said

    In 2016, Princeton HealthCare officials said Penn Medicine was selected after a review of partnership possibilities with 17 healthcare systems.

    The Plainsboro hospital opened in 2012 and replaced the former Princeton Medical Center hospital in downtown Princeton.

    Kevin Shea may be reached at kshea@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter@kevintshea. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    Niche.com released its latest best school rankings; click here to see where your school checks in.


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    See which players are at the top of each statistical list early in the season.


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    A look at the top statistical leaders from across the state.


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    The Newark police detective faces a gun charge and aggravated assault.

    A New York man who had an off-duty Newark police detective point a gun in his face at a steak house in Woodbridge in 2015 told a jury Wednesday morning he has no idea why the officer drew his weapon.

    The detective, Andre Evans, 43, is now facing two charges as a result of the Oct. 25, 2015 incident: possession of a weapon for unlawful purpose and aggravated assault. 

    "I didn't know who he was," Eric Hannon, 56, said in Middlesex County Superior Court. "I just know he pointed a gun in my face."

    A video showcasing the incident was played various times for the jury.

    According to the testimony of restaurant's assistant manager, Darnell Ross, Evans and his wife Maggie were at Chris Michael's Steak House celebrating the graduation of a colleague from a police academy.

    As they were were leaving the party, Hannon said he asked Evans' wife for a cigarette, and that prompted the a confrontation between Hannon and the detective.

    Ross testified Wednesday that after Evans pulled out his service revolver, he intervened by taking the gun. Ross said he placed the weapon back in Evans' car when Woodbridge police arrived at the scene.

    Woodbridge police arrested the detective.

    In a flamboyant 25-minute opening statement on Tuesday, Evan's attorney, Patrick Toscano said Hannon wasn't a victim and described the detective as the "nicest human being in the world." Toscano said Evans intended to arrest Hannon, though he never identified himself as a police officer, and had every right to take the actions that he did.

    Cross examining the restaurant manager, assistant manager and alleged victim,  Toscano, pointed out discrepancies in their account of the events, using a white board to tally what he said were the witnesses' lies.

    In the prosecution's opening statement on Tuesday, Assistant Prosecutor Jody Carbone said Evans was out of control and asked the jury to convict him.

    "Under our law, simply pointing a gun at a person constitutes assault," Carbone said. 

    Evans and his wife are also set to take the stand during the trial. 

    Taylor Tiamoyo Harris may be reached at tharris@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @ladytiamoyo.

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    A Carteret man is no longer a naturalized citizen and can be deported

    A naturalized citizen living in Carteret was stripped of his citizenship after authorities learned he used a false name around the time he entered the country a quarter-century ago, the Department of Justice said Tuesday.

    A judge revoked Baljinder Singh's citizenship Friday after he was accused in September of using the alias to avoid deportation for decades.

    Singh arrived in the United States from Hong Kong in 1991, giving the name Davinder Singh at San Francisco International Airport. He had no proof of identity.

    Carteret man accused of lying to get citizenship 

    Singh was scheduled to appear at an immigration hearing but failed to show up and a deportation order was issued. On Feb. 6, 1992, Singh filed an application for asylum under the name Baljinder Singh.

    Singh married in 1996 and gave up his asylum application, becoming a naturalized citizen in 2006 with his wife filing a visa petition on his behalf.

    Singh is the first person de-naturalized under Operation Janus, an initiative by the Department of Homeland Security to weed out naturalized citizens who circumvented fingerprint and other background checks during the naturalization process. Singh's is one of an estimated 1,600 cases that have been or will be referred for prosecution, authorities said.   

    "The defendant exploited our immigration system and unlawfully secured the ultimate immigration benefit of naturalization, which undermines both the nation's security and our lawful immigration system," said Acting Assistant Attorney General Chad Readler of the Justice Department's Civil Division. "The Justice Department will continue to use every tool to protect the integrity of our nation's immigration system, including the use of civil denaturalization."

    Singh is now considered a lawful permanent resident and can be deported at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security.

    Paul Milo may be reached at pmilo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter@PaulMilo2. Find NJ.com on Facebook.  

     

     

     


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    Lance Nelson, who worked as an assistant zoning officer for Perth Amboy through the end of 2017, faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine

    A former Perth Amboy employee admitted he never told the government that his great aunt had died so he could steal tens of thousands of dollars in Social Security funds for nearly two decades. 

    Lance D. Nelson, 56, pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court in Trenton before U.S. District Judge Anne E. Thompson to one count of theft of government funds, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito said in a release.

    Nelson failed to report the death of his great aunt in February 1998 and collected $184,936 of Social Security benefits that were deposited in their joint account, the release said. He was indicted in July of last year.

    Nelson, who worked as an assistant zoning officer for Perth Amboy through the end of 2017, faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, authorities said.

    According to city payroll information obtained through a records request last year, Nelson was hired in 1997 and made $84,728 per year. 

    His sentencing is scheduled for April 17.

    Craig McCarthy may be reached at 732-372-2078 or at CMcCarthy@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @createcraig and on Facebook here. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

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    The highways and bi-ways and everything in-between in the Garden State.

    When I first got my driver's license -- back in 19 mumble, mumble -- there was no Global Positioning System. There also weren't smart phones, let alone apps that told you how to get somewhere or how to avoid traffic jams.

    We relied solely on our memories and, of course, maps. Not all that long ago, I pulled out a map when one of my children asked how to get somewhere. As I unfolded it, I was met with a blank stare; it was a foreign sight to my millennial. I imagine I'd get the same reaction if I leafed through a TV guide while sitting in front of our flat screen.

    I like maps. And, as someone who has charted many trips with the help of Rand McNally, I've wondered about the labeling of roadways.

    Matt Soniak offered some explanation on mentalfloss.com.

    Soniak writes about science, history, etymology and Bruce Springsteen for both the website and the print magazine. His work has appeared in print and online for Men's Health, Scientific American, The Atlantic, and Philly.com.

    According to Soniak, "roads" run between two distant points -- two towns, for example. In those towns, you'll find "streets," lined with houses and other buildings.

    An "avenue" is traditionally a straight road with a line of trees or shrubs running along each side; a "boulevard" is usually a widened, multi-lane street with a median and landscaping between the curbs and sidewalks on either side.

    A "court?" A short street that ends as a cul de sac. "Drive" can be short for "driveway," a private road for local access to one, or a small group of structures. Other times it refers to meandering, rather than straight, roads and highways.

    A "lane" is a narrow road or street usually lacking a shoulder or a median, while a "way" is a minor street off a road in a town.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    For larger thoroughfares, an "expressway" is a divided highway meant for high-speed traffic. A "freeway" is a road designed for safe high-speed traffic by the elimination of intersections at the same grade or level. A "highway" is a main road intended for travel between destinations like cities and towns.

    "Routes" can be interstate highways, designated by "U.S." as in U.S. Route 1 or county routes, also referred to as "state secondary routes."

    I grew up on Chimes Terrace; I have no idea what that means.

    Here's a gallery of New Jersey streets and roads. And here are links to similar galleries from the past.

    Vintage photos of streets and roads in N.J.

    Vintage photos of street scenes in N.J.

    Vintage photos of New Jersey street scenes

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Check out who's rising and who's falling.


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    It was bought in Middlesex County Watch video

    A $153,466 Jersey Cash 5 ticket for Wednesday's drawing was bought at a New Jersey deli.

    The winning ticket was sold at South Amboy Deli & Subs on North Stevens Street in South Amboy, state lottery officials said Thursday.

    The ticket matched each of the five numbers drawn: 5, 7, 18, 23 and 27. The XTRA number was: 2

    The odds of a $1 ticket winning the jackpot are 962,598 to 1. 

    The top prize for Thursday's drawing resets to $75,000.

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    Alabama head coach Nick Saban confirmed Fitzpatrick's decision during a press conference on Thursday afternoon.

    Just three days after winning a second straight national title with Alabama, Minkah Fitzpatrick has decided to declare for the 2018 NFL Draft.

    Alabama head coach Nick Saban confirmed Fitzpatrick's decision during a press conference on Thursday afternoon.

    Fitzpatrick, who graduated from St. Peter's Prep in 2015, won both the Thorpe Award – given to the nation’s top defensive back – and the Bednarik Award – awarded to college football's top defensive player – this season. The junior was just the third player ever to win both awards, joining Charles Woodson and Patrick Peterson.

    Experts believe that Fitzpatrick will be among the first defensive players drafted and anticipate that he'll be selected early in the first round.


    RELATED: Latest NFL mock draft: Surprise top pick? Who do Giants, Jets take?


    Fitzpatrick was an all-purpose star during his time at St. Peter's Prep. Offensively, he ran for 503 yards and seven TDs and added 45 catches for 1,111 yards and 12 TDs as a senior. Defensively, he tallied 66 tackles, three interceptions and one fumble recovery.

    The Old Bridge native moved to defensive back full time as a freshman at Alabama and quickly worked his way into the starting lineup. Fitzpatrick tallied 171 tackles, five sacks, nine interceptions – including four that he returned for TDs – and two fumble recoveries during his three seasons with the Crimson Tide.

    During Monday night's 26-23 overtime win against Georgia in the national championship game, Fitzpatrick came up with five tackles – including two solo efforts and one tackle for loss.

    Matt Stypulkoski may be reached at mstypulkoski@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @M_Stypulkoski. Like NJ.com High School Sports on Facebook.


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    The NJ Advance Media wrestling staff releases its first group and conference rankings of the season


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    Prancer was found in a dump on the island of Anguilla

    mx0114pet.jpgPrancer 

    MIDDLESEX -- Prancer is a 12-week-old male mixed-breed in the care of Island Puppy Rescue.

    Found in a dump on the island of Anguilla, he was brought to a local shelter before coming to the U.S.

    Prancer is described by volunteers as "a typical playful puppy." He has been neutered and is up-to-date on shots.

    For more information or to arrange to meet Prancer, email islandpups@msn.com or call 908-720-5167. Island Puppy Rescue is a nonprofit organization working to save homeless and mistreated animals from the Caribbean; the group is currently caring for three dogs. For more information, go to islandpuppyrescue.org.

    Shelters interested in placing a pet in the Paw Print adoption column or submitting news should call 973-836-4922 or email middlesex@starledger.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Check out some top storylines from this week.


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    What is going to happen this weekend?


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    WOODBRIDGE -- This photo was taken on New Brunswick Avenue in Fords, Woodbridge Township, in 1958. MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey According to information from Fords Fire Company No. 1, the pumps were operating to drain the basements of businesses flooded from the thaw of a winter storm. If you would like to share a photo that provides a...

    WOODBRIDGE -- This photo was taken on New Brunswick Avenue in Fords, Woodbridge Township, in 1958.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    According to information from Fords Fire Company No. 1, the pumps were operating to drain the basements of businesses flooded from the thaw of a winter storm.

    If you would like to share a photo that provides a glimpse of history in your community, please call 973-836-4922 or send an email to middlesex@starledger.com. And, check out more glimpses of history in our online galleries on nj.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    10 of N.J. hockey's top players over the past week.


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    See the biggest stories in N.J. girls basketball this week.


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